Skip to Content

COVID-19 Info: Vaccines (5 & up) | Boosters | Testing | Visitor Guidelines | Stats | More

IMPORTANT NOTICE: COVID-19 testing appointments are not available at Cone Health emergency departments or urgent care locations. Click here for testing options.

Orthognathic Surgery for Malocclusion

Surgery Overview

Orthognathic surgery treats malocclusion ("poor bite"). It restructures the jaw through cutting the bone and repositioning the bone segments.

Adults who have jaw-related malocclusion are sometimes offered a choice. They can have simple orthodontic treatment . Or they can have orthodontic treatment combined with orthognathic surgery. Adults who have severe jaw problems may need surgery to improve their looks and how the jaw works. Severe jaw problems can include upper jaws that don't match with the lower jaws.

Oral and maxillofacial surgeons or plastic surgeons perform this surgery using general anesthesia. Recovery takes several weeks. While the bone slowly heals, the jaw is held in place with wires or plates and screws.

The most common problem after this surgery is numbness of the upper or lower lip (paresthesia). Other risks include infection, bleeding (hemorrhage), swelling, muscle spasm, and temporomandibular disorder.

For most people, this surgery is elective, based on personal choice. The surgery requires a long and difficult recovery period, Make sure to carefully weigh the benefits against the hardship and expense of the surgery.

For those few people who also have serious functional problems, such as problems with chewing or closing the mouth, orthognathic surgery may be a necessity.

Related Information

Credits

Current as of: June 30, 2021

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review:
Adam Husney MD - Family Medicine
Martin J. Gabica MD - Family Medicine
William F. Hohlt DDS - Orthodontics

Wellness Matters

Subscribe to our Wellness Matters e-newsletter, a monthly snapshot of the some of great wellness content from Cone Health providers.

Subscribe Now

Health Library