Skip to Content

Committed to Safety: As we resume services, we are taking all necessary precautions to keep you safe while we care for you. Limited visitation is now in place. Review all our visitor policies and precautions. Get more information on COVID-19.

Kidney Stones: Medicines That Increase Your Risk

Topic Overview

Some medicines make it more likely that you will develop a specific type of kidney stone.

Calcium stones

Medicines that make you more likely to develop calcium stones include:

  • Loop diuretics, such as furosemide and acetazolamide.
  • Some antacids.
  • Glucocorticoids, such as dexamethasone.
  • Theophylline.

Vitamins C and D can increase your risk of calcium stones when you take more than the daily recommendations.

Uric acid stones

Medicines that make you more likely to develop uric acid stones include:

  • Thiazides, such as hydrochlorothiazide.
  • Aspirin products (salicylates).
  • Gout medicine, such as probenecid.

Medicines that actually make stones

Some medicines will result in your body making kidney stones. These include:

  • Potassium-sparing diuretics, such as triamterene.
  • Antivirals, such as acyclovir.
  • Protease inhibitors, such as indinavir.

Related Information

Credits

Current as of: August 12, 2019

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review: E. Gregory Thompson, MD - Internal Medicine
Adam Husney, MD - Family Medicine
Kathleen Romito, MD - Family Medicine
Tushar J Vachharajani, MD, FASN, FACP - Nephrology

Wellness Matters

Subscribe to our Wellness Matters e-newsletter, a monthly snapshot of the some of great wellness content from Cone Health providers.

Subscribe Now

Health Library