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Published on August 09, 2016

Conversations You Should Have But Don’t: End of Life Care

Conversations at the End of LifeDon’t wait until a health crisis happens to talk about end-of-life care and Advance Directives. It’s one of the most important conversations to have. And it’s not just for the elderly or those with a serious illness. Don’t wait to start talking about your wishes. Join Elizabeth Golding, DO, medical director of the Cone Health Palliative Medicine Team, a member of Cone Health Medical Group, to learn more about the conversation you should have, but don't.

Conversations You Should Have But Don’t: End of Life Care

Q: Is there an AD for military personnel who may be serving in other states or countries?

A: Thank you for this important question. Active duty military members and their families may relocate frequently to different states and deployment locations, raising concerns that an Advance Directive may not be recognized by one state if it was completed in another state. To help overcome this hurdle, Congress passed a law which says that states must honor advance directives regardless of the state they were drafted in and the documents should be given the same authority as if they were completed in the state for which recognition of the directive is being requested.

The DOD does not use a specific form for military members and their families, but advance directives are encouraged and required to be addressed by Department of Defense (DOD) health care providers. The types of forms used may vary between service branches and locations. If you are an active duty military member or a family member of an active duty serviceperson who would like help completing an Advance Directive, please contact your legal assistance office or JAGC officer for assistance.